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Do Covid vaccine shots affect menstrual cycle length? Study says yes

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Covid vaccine shots can temporarily increase the menstrual cycle length by less than a day, according to a study A study published in the British Medical Journal has found that Covid-19 vaccine shots can temporarily increase the length of your menstrual cycle.

The study said that the vaccine shots taken to prevent oneself from the coronavirus infection will increase the menstrual cycle by less than half a day.

But the increase in the menstrual cycle doesn’t go on for a certain period of time. In those who were studied, the menstrual cycle temporarily increased in the menstrual cycle in which they were vaccinated.

The researchers from Oregon Health & Science University, United States, determined that on average, vaccinated people experienced an increase of less than one day in each menstrual cycle in which they were vaccinated.

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