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What is the difference between Memorial Day and Veterans Day?

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HOUSTON - Memorial Day and Veterans Day are two important holidays that honor those who have served in the United States military.

However, there is a difference between the two holidays.Houston events & things to do this Memorial Day weekend: Comicpalooza, Forever Motown, food festivalsMemorial Day is a federal holiday in the United States for remembering and honoring those who have died while serving in the U.S.

military. It is observed on the last Monday of May. Deadly Memorial Day weekend crashes: Study shows Houston, Dallas among U.S.

cities with most fatalitiesThis year it is observed on May 29.Memorial Day was formerly called Decoration Day and originated as a way to honor those who died in the Civil War.

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