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Police identify 'dangerous' motorcyclist riding around Bucks County

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BENSALEM, Pa. - Police say they have successfully identified a man they claimed was wreaking havoc on the streets of one Bucks County township.Investigators in Bensalem took to social media Monday to ask for the public's help in identifying him.Witnesses told police a young man was driving dangerously near the intersection of Spruce and Hazel Avenue in Trevose Monday afternoon.The motorcyclist was also caught running stop signs repeatedly in Bensalem Township, according to authorities.MORE HEADLINES:He could be seen riding his motorcycle without a helmet at least one occasion in a photo posted by police.Tuesday, police shared an update on their investigation saying they had identified the rider and that he would be receiving traffic violations. .

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