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Code Red: Air quality alert declared for all of Pennsylvania amid Canadian wildfires

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PHILADELPHIA - Pennsylvania residents are being urged to remain cautious as the Department of Environmental Protection declares a Code Red Air Quality Action Day for the entire state.Smoke from Canadian wildfires triggered officials to issue an air quality alert for all of Wednesday, stating that conditions "degraded overnight."Fine particulate matter in the air may make it difficult for young children, the elderly, and those with respiratory problems to breathe, according to health officials.Vulnerable individuals should avoid outdoor activities, while officials ask everyone to reduce any prolonged or heavy physical activity.RELATED COVERAGE: Philadelphia air quality: Streets empty as residents heed Code Red AlertOfficials believe the smoke will affect air quality Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, with some relief possible on Saturday.

The new alert comes just weeks after Philadelphia was thrust into a Code Red from wildfires in Canada, emptying typically busy streets.To check current conditions in your area, and tips on how to protect yourself from air pollution, visit the EPA AirNow website..

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