Canada Eu Greece Jordan St. Johns death BBC Racing Health Digital Ripple reports Canada Eu Greece Jordan St. Johns

What the Titanic sub saga and the Greek migrant shipwreck say about our reactions to tragedy

Reading now: 964
www.fox29.com

lost submersible that had gone into the depths of the ocean to see the Titanic wreckage rippled across the national and global conversation — culminating in news that the craft had imploded and its five occupants were dead.But a far bigger disaster days earlier, the wrecking of a ship off Greece filled with migrants that killed at least 80 people and left a horrifying 500 missing, did not become a moment-by-moment worldwide focus in anywhere near the same way.One grabbed unrelenting, moment-to-moment attention.

One was watched and discussed as another sad, but routine, news story.READ MORE: Hundreds missing in migrant boat sinking; EU Commissioner says 'worst ever tragedy' in MediterraneanWhat makes these two events at sea different in how they were received?

Viewed next to each other, what do they say about human reactions to tragic news? And why did the saga of the submersible grab so much attention?The Polar Prince, the main support ship for the Titan submersible, arrives at the Port of St.

Johns in Newfoundland, Canada, on Saturday June 24, 2023. (Photo by Jordan Pettitt/PA Images via Getty Images) By the time the world learned about the Greek shipwreck, the event had already taken place and, to some extent, the outcome was already known.

Read more on fox29.com
The website covid-19.rehab is an aggregator of news from open sources. The source is indicated at the beginning and at the end of the announcement. You can send a complaint on the news if you find it unreliable.

Related News

Can you pass the citizenship test? Most Canadians would fail, poll suggests - globalnews.ca - Britain - France - Canada - county Canadian
globalnews.ca
77%
650
Can you pass the citizenship test? Most Canadians would fail, poll suggests
Canada Day approaches, but a new poll suggests their minds aren’t full of the knowledge needed to pass a citizenship test.In a survey of 1,512 Canadian adults, Leger found that only 23 per cent would pass the citizenship test, based on their answers to 10 randomly selected questions.People who wish to become Canadian need to answer 20 questions about citizens’ rights and responsibilities, as well as Canada’s history, geography, economy, government, laws and symbols.They need to score at least 75 per cent to pass, but the average score of the Canadians who were surveyed was only 49 per cent.The questions focused on things like famous Canadians (Who is John Buchan?), history (Who established the first European settlements in Canada?) and national symbols (Whose portrait is on the Canadian $10 bill?).The correct answers, for those struggling along with most survey respondents, are: a popular governor general, the French and Viola Desmond.History questions seemed to trip up respondents the most: For example, only 24 per cent knew that the House of Commons recognized in 2006 that the Quebecois form a nation within a united Canada.Only 29 per cent knew the Constitutional Act granted legislative assemblies elected by the people, and only 41 per cent knew that English settlement began in 1610.They fared slightly better when it came to national symbols and influential people: 49 per cent knew that Marjorie Turner-Bailey is an Olympian and descendant of black loyalists, and 42 per cent recognized Canada’s motto, “From sea to sea.”Most Canadians were also in-the-know about the main groups of Indigenous Peoples in the country, with 79 per cent correctly identifying First Nations, Metis and Inuit.People in Western Canada scored
DMCA